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The Power of One

Courtenay, Bryce (Book - 2007 )
Average Rating: 4.5 stars out of 5.
The Power of One
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Item Details

Follows Peekay, a white British boy in South Africa during World War II, between the ages of five and eleven, as he survives an abusive boarding school and goes on to succeed in life and the boxing ring, with help from a chicken, a boxer, a pianist, black African prisoners, and many others.
Authors: Courtenay, Bryce, 1933-
Title: The power of one
Publisher: New York : Laurel-Leaf Books, 2007, c1989.
Edition: Young readers' condensed ed.
Characteristics: 373 p. ;,18 cm.
Notes: "First Laurel-Leaf edition"--T.p. verso.
"Unabridged version first published in hardcover in Australia by William Heinemann in 1989. Condensed version originally published in hardcover in Australia by Penguin Books, Ltd, Sydney, in 1999"--T.p. verso.
Summary: Follows Peekay, a white British boy in South Africa during World War II, between the ages of five and eleven, as he survives an abusive boarding school and goes on to succeed in life and the boxing ring, with help from a chicken, a boxer, a pianist, black African prisoners, and many others.
Audience: 5.8
Local Note: 15 16 17 152
ISBN: 9780440239130
Statement of Responsibility: Bryce Courtenay
Subject Headings: Self-confidence Juvenile fiction. Conduct of life Juvenile fiction. South Africa History 1909-1961 Juvenile fiction. Boxing Juvenile fiction. Prejudices Juvenile fiction. Apartheid Juvenile fiction. World War, 1939-1945 South Africa Juvenile fiction.
Topical Term: Self-confidence
Conduct of life
Boxing
Prejudices
Apartheid
World War, 1939-1945
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Feb 18, 2014
  • gailsusan rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

I loved this book! Courtenay is a great writer who tells a great story that is almost totally believable. Is there anyone else, though, who did not love the very ending. I could not picture Peekay having it in him to cut the swastika from the Judge's arm. Any comments?

Jan 24, 2014
  • galactickim rated this: 2 stars out of 5.

Started off really enjoying this book, but then it got old. I stopped reading it about half way through. Perhaps I was more disappointed than I should have been because of the hype about the book. It just didn't keep me interested enough to keep reading - long-winded.

Sep 15, 2013
  • RoseofLima rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Dummie

Jun 12, 2013
  • labellasorella rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

This was a very realistic story that I enjoyed reading. The book the story of the power that one individual can have. In order to truly enjoy this book, the individual must be mature enough to realize the meaning of the story.

Jan 18, 2013
  • erinsnest rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Still my favourite book. My teenage son agreed!.........Flash forward to Dec 2012, a visit from my son who is now 21. "Mom, do you have a copy of the Power of One? It's still my favorite book and I can't find a copy anywhere. Well, I had picked a spare one up at Valu Village last April, and was very glad I could give him one! He had never forgotten the description of the lady on the train! That was very powerful for him.

Nov 12, 2012
  • lozza1401 rated this: 2 stars out of 5.

I expected a lot more from this as everyone had read it when I was younger then I realised there was another version of this book for young people. Some parts were long-winded and far too descriptive but I enjoyed reading about race-relations in South Africa during the war. Still, I would not read it again.

Jun 28, 2011
  • Russ_A rated this: 2 stars out of 5.

Two stars in this system means OK, which this book was, so it's not really a putdown, but I was expecting much more from this very popular book. The characters were stereotypes, with school bullies becoming Nazis and the little guy always more virtuous and intelligent, etc. At times it enlightened me as to life in South Africa 70 years ago, but too often it dragged. I only got halfway through before I had to return the book so I skipped to the very predictable ending. I would say enjoy the scenery in this one and ignore the hokey plot line and characters.

Jun 16, 2011
  • ReferenceChick rated this: 2 stars out of 5.

A long-winded, self-involved novel about boxing and life lessons.

Mar 31, 2011
  • vwruleschick rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

I read this book in High School, and I could not put it down.

I believe this book is a classic, whereby I could re-read this book again every a couple years and see the story in a different light and learn something new.

The author does a lovely job in decribing the characters and the how the South African culture was at that time. As well as, challenges and triumfs that come along with this story.

Highly Recommend!

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Jun 12, 2013
  • labellasorella rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

labellasorella thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

Jul 18, 2011
  • bidbid rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

bidbid thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

Jul 21, 2008
  • Lauren rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

Lauren thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

Summary

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Jun 12, 2013
  • labellasorella rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

A young, white British boy is put into a boarding school full of white, Dutch boys. He is greatly mistreated and has no friends except grandpa Chook. Peekay never speaks of his true name. This is because Peekay took the power away from his bullies by making that cruel speech his name. As Peekay grows up, he discovers his power of one through all of his experiences.

Jul 12, 2012
  • Mr_Goodbytes rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

In 1939, as Hitler cast his enormous, cruel shadow across the world, hatred of a similar kind took root in South Africa, where the seeds of apartheid were newly sown. There a boy called Peekay was born. He spoke the wrong language -- English, the language spoken by those who had sent the Afrikaners to the world's first concentration camps during the Boer War. He was suckled by a woman of the wrong color -- black, the color of fear and disdain. His childhood was marked by humiliation and abandonment. Yet he vowed to survive -- he would become welterweight champion of the world, he would dream heroic dreams.

But his dreams were nothing compared to what awaited him. For he embarked on an epic journey through a land of tribal superstition and modern prejudice, where he would learn the power of words, the power to transform lives, and the mystical power that would sustain him even when it appeared that villainy would rule the world: the power of one.

Notices

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Jun 12, 2013
  • labellasorella rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Frightening or Intense Scenes: A lot of emotion involved, creating an intensity that suits life.

Jun 12, 2013
  • labellasorella rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Sexual Content: Peekay goes through puberty for a couple of pages.

Jun 12, 2013
  • labellasorella rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Violence: There are deaths and there is fighting.

Jun 12, 2013
  • labellasorella rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Coarse Language: Tolerable language; not anything people haven't heard before.

Quotes

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Jul 12, 2012
  • Mr_Goodbytes rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

I only English, the infected tongue that had spread like a plague into the sacred land and contaminated the pure, sweet waters of Afrikanerdom . . . I spoke the language that had pronounced the sentences that had killed their grandfathers and sent their grandmothers to the world's first concentration camps, where they had died like flies . . . the sins of the fathers had been visited upon the sons, unto the third generation. I was infected.

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Version pocillo (pocillo) Last updated 2014/09/02 11:42